Balancing Weight training and BJJ

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Balancing Weight training and BJJ can be tricky...

But first you need to decide one of the following...

A) Be the Best Possible at lifting

B) Be Very Good at Lifting but dabble in BJJ

C) Be pretty damn good at both

D) Be very Good at BJJ and be legit strong via lifitng

E) Be the Best Possible at BJJ (but still lift a bit)

You don't have to Choose any one indefinnitely; however, you gotta choose one at a time.

For more awesome info, check out this long but very informative video on the matter...

How to be a Good Training Partner in Filipino Kali

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It's important to be a good training partner in all the arts; however, Kali has some specific rules that may apply...

When learning martial arts, you will encounter all different kinds of training partners. Some are great, and others can be hard to work with. The truth of the matter is that you need a good training partner in order to grow. Without a good training partner, your growth will be very limited.

If you want to find a good partner, you have to be someone who others want to train with. You can’t be the guy everyone avoids in class when it is time to pick a partner. This is usually the guy who goes too fast, doesn’t feed you right, and thinks he knows better than the instructor, so he tries to teach you his version of the technique.

Don’t be like that guy.

Read more of the article at Kali Gear...

The 3 R’s of Habit Change: How To Start New Habits That Actually Stick

By James Clear    |    Behavioral PsychologyHabits

Your life today is essentially the sum of your habits.

How in shape or out of shape you are? A result of your habits.

How happy or unhappy you are? A result of your habits.

How successful or unsuccessful you are? A result of your habits.

What you repeatedly do (i.e. what you spend time thinking about and doing each day) ultimately forms the person you are, the things you believe, and the personality that you portray.

But what if you want to improve? What if you want to form new habits? How would you go about it?

Turns out, there's a helpful framework that can make it easier to stick to new habits so that you can improve your health, your work, and your life in general.

Let's talk about that framework now…

Before we talk about how to get started, I wanted to let you know I researched and compiled science-backed ways to stick to good habits and stop procrastinating. Want to check out my insights? Download my free PDF guide “Transform Your Habits” here.

The 3 R’s of Habit Change

Every habit you have — good or bad — follows the same 3–step pattern.

  1. Reminder (the trigger that initiates the behavior)
  2. Routine (the behavior itself; the action you take)
  3. Reward (the benefit you gain from doing the behavior)

I call this framework “The 3 R's of Habit Change,” but I didn't come up with this pattern on my own. It’s been proven over and over again by behavioral psychology researchers.

I first learned about the process of habit formation from Stanford professor, BJ Fogg. More recently, I read about it in Charles Duhigg’s best–selling book, The Power of Habit (audiobook). 

Duhigg's book refers to the three steps of the “Habit Loop” as cue, routine, reward. BJ Fogg uses the word trigger instead of cue. And I prefer reminder since it gives us the memorable “3 R's.”

Regardless, don't get hung up on the terminology. It's more important to realize that there’s a lot of science behind the process of habit formation, and so we can be relatively confident that your habits follow the same cycle, whatever you choose to call it.

What a Habit Looks Like When Broken Down

Before we get into each step, let’s use the 3 R's to break down a typical habit. For example, answering a phone call…

  1. Your phone rings (reminder). This is the reminder that initiates the behavior. The ring acts as a trigger or cue to tell you to answer the phone. It is the prompt that starts the behavior.
  2. You answer your phone (routine). This is the actual behavior. When your phone rings, you answer the phone.
  3. You find out who is calling (reward). This is the reward (or punishment, depending on who is calling). The reward is the benefit gained from doing the behavior. You wanted to find out why the person on the other end was calling you and discovering that piece of information is the reward for completing the habit.

If the reward is positive, then you'll want to repeat the routine again the next time the reminder happens. Repeat the same action enough times and it becomes a habit. Every habit follows this basic 3–step structure.

 All habits form by the same 3–step process. Here's an example: the traffic light turns green, you drive through the intersection, you make it closer to your destination. Reminder, routine, reward. (Graphic based on Charles Duhigg's “Habit Loop” in  The Power of Habit . Created by James Clear.)

All habits form by the same 3–step process. Here's an example: the traffic light turns green, you drive through the intersection, you make it closer to your destination. Reminder, routine, reward. (Graphic based on Charles Duhigg's “Habit Loop” in The Power of Habit. Created by James Clear.)

How can you use this structure to create new habits and actually stick to them?

Here's how…

Step 1: Set a Reminder for Your New Habit

If you talk to your friends about starting a new habit, they might tell you that you need to exercise self–control or that you need to find a new dose of willpower.

I disagree.

Getting motivated and trying to remember to do a new behavior is the exact wrong way to go about it. If you're a human, then your memory and your motivation will fail you. It's just a fact.

This is why the reminder is such a critical part of forming new habits. A good reminder does not rely on motivation and it doesn't require you to remember to do your new habit.

A good reminder makes it easy to start by encoding your new behavior in something that you already do.

For example, when I wrote about the secret to sticking to little healthy habits, I said that I created a new habit of flossing by always doing it after brushing my teeth. The act of brushing my teeth was something that I already did and it acted as the reminder to do my new behavior.

To make things even easier and prevent myself from having to remember to floss, I bought a bowl, placed it next to my toothbrush, and put a handful of pre–made flossers in it. Now I see the floss every time I reach for my toothbrush.

Setting up a visible reminder and linking my new habit with a current behavior made it much easier to change. No need to be motivated. No need to remember.

It doesn’t matter if it’s working out or eating healthy or creating art, you can’t expect yourself to magically stick to a new habit without setting up a system that makes it easier to start.

How to Choose Your Reminder

Picking the correct reminder for your new habit is the first step to making change easier.

The best way I know to discover a good reminder for your new habit is to write down two lists. In the first list, write down the things that you do each day without fail.

For example…

  • Get in the shower.
  • Put your shoes on.
  • Brush your teeth.
  • Flush the toilet.
  • Sit down for dinner.
  • Turn the lights off.
  • Get into bed.

You'll often find that many of these items are daily health habits like washing your face, drinking morning tea, brushing your teeth, and so on. Those actions can act as reminders for new health habits. For example, “After I drink my morning tea, I meditate for 60 seconds.”

In the second list, write down the things that happen to you each day without fail.

For example…

  • Traffic light turns red.
  • You get a text message.
  • A commercial comes on TV.
  • A song ends.
  • The sun sets.

With these two lists, you'll have a wide range of things that you already do and already respond to each day. Those are the perfect reminders for new habits.

For example, let's say you want to feel happier. Expressing gratitude is one proven way to boost happiness. Using the list above, you could pick the reminder “sit down for dinner” and use it as a cue to say one thing that you’re grateful for today.

“When I sit down for dinner, I say one thing that I'm grateful for today.”

That's the type of small behavior that could blossom into a more grateful outlook on life in general.

Step 2: Choose a Habit That's Incredibly Easy to Start

Make it so easy you can't say no.
Leo Babauta 

I’ve written about this before, but your life goals are not your habits.

It’s easy to get caught up in the desire to make massive changes in your life. We watch incredible weight loss transformations and think that we need to lose 30 pounds in the next 4 weeks. We see elite athletes on TV and wish that we could run faster and jump higher tomorrow. We want to earn more, do more, and be more … right now.

I’ve felt those things too, so I get it. And in general, I applaud the enthusiasm. I'm glad that you want great things for your life and I want to do what I can to help you achieve them. But it's important to remember that lasting change is a product of daily habits, not once–in–a–lifetime transformations.

If you want to start a new habit and begin living healthier and happier, then I have one suggestion that I cannot emphasis enough: start small. In the words of Leo Babauta, “make it so easy that you can't say no.”

How small? BJ Fogg suggests that people who want to start flossing begin by only flossing one tooth. Just one. 

In the beginning, performance doesn’t matter. Become the type of person who always sticks to your new habit. You can build up to the level of performance that you want once the behavior becomes consistent.

Here’s your action step: Decide what want your new habit to be. Now ask yourself, “How can I make this new behavior so easy to do that I can’t say no?”

What is Your Reward?

It’s important to celebrate. (I think that’s just as true in life as it is with habits.)

We want to continue doing things that make us feel good. And because an action needs to be repeated for it to become a habit, it’s especially important that you reward yourself each time you practice your new habit.

For example, if I’m working towards a new fitness goal, then I’ll often tell myself at the end of a workout, “That was good day.” Or, “Good job. You made progress today.”

If you feel like it, you could even tell yourself “Victory!” or “Success!” each time you do your new habit.

I haven’t done this myself, but some people swear by it.

  • Floss one tooth. “Victory!”
  • Eat a healthy meal. “Success!”
  • Do five pushups. “Good work!”

Give yourself some credit and enjoy each success.

Related note: Only go after habits that are important to you. It's tough to find a reward when you're simply doing things because other people say they are important.

Where to Go From Here

In general, you’ll find that these three steps fit almost any habit. The specifics, however, may take some work.

You might have to experiment before you find the right cue that reminds you to start a new habit. You might have to think a bit before figuring out how to make your new habit so easy that you can’t say no. And rewarding yourself with positive self–talk can take some getting used to if you're not someone who typically does that.

It’s all a process, my friend.

Stretching is Good for you -- seriously...

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The importance of stretching

From Harvard Medical School

Published: September, 2013

It's not enough to build muscle and achieve aerobic fitness. You need to think about flexibility, too.

You may think of stretching as something performed only by runners or gymnasts. But we all need to stretch in order to protect our mobility and independence. "A lot of people don't understand that stretching has to happen on a regular basis. It should be daily," says David Nolan, a physical therapist at Harvard-affiliated Massachusetts General Hospital.

Why it's important

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Stretching keeps the muscles flexible, strong, and healthy, and we need that flexibility to maintain a range of motion in the joints. Without it, the muscles shorten and become tight. Then, when you call on the muscles for activity, they are weak and unable to extend all the way. That puts you at risk for joint pain, strains, and muscle damage.

For example, sitting in a chair all day results in tight hamstrings in the back of the thigh. That can make it harder to extend your leg or straighten your knee all the way, which inhibits walking. Likewise, when tight muscles are suddenly called on for a strenuous activity that stretches them, such as playing tennis, they may become damaged from suddenly being stretched. Injured muscles may not be strong enough to support the joints, which can lead to joint injury.

Regular stretching keeps muscles long, lean, and flexible, and this means that exertion "won't put too much force on the muscle itself," says Nolan. Healthy muscles also help a person with balance problems to avoid falls.

Where to start

With a body full of muscles, the idea of daily stretching may seem overwhelming. But Nolan says you don't have to stretch every muscle you have. "The areas critical for mobility are in your lower extremities: your calves, your hamstrings, your hip flexors in the pelvis and quadriceps in the front of the thigh." Stretching your shoulders, neck, and lower back is also beneficial. Aim for a program of daily stretches or at least three or four times per week.

Find a physical therapist (your local Y is a good place to start) who can assess your muscle strength and tailor a stretching program to fit your needs. If you have chronic conditions such as Parkinson's disease or arthritis, you'll want to clear a new stretching regimen with your doctor before you start.

 

A hamstring stretch will keep the muscles in the back of your thigh exible. Sit on the floor with your legs in front of you. Slide your hands down your legs until you feel a burning sensation. Hold for 30 seconds, then slowly return to a sitting position.

The cumulative effect of stretching

Stretching once today won't magically give you perfect flexibility. You'll need to do it over time and remain committed to the process. "It may have taken you many months to get tight muscles, so you're not going to be perfectly flexible after one or two sessions," says physical therapist David Nolan of Massachusetts General Hospital. "It takes weeks to months to get flexible, and you'll have to continue working on it to maintain it."

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A hamstring stretch will keep the muscles in the back of your thigh exible. Sit on the floor with your legs in front of you. Slide your hands down your legs until you feel a burning sensation. Hold for 30 seconds, then slowly return to a sitting position.

Proper execution

We used to believe that stretching was necessary to warm up the muscles and prepare them for activity. However, mounting research has shown that stretching the muscles before they're warmed up can actually hurt them. "When everything is cold, the fibers aren't prepared and may be damaged. If you exercise first, you'll get blood flow to the area, and that makes the tissue more pliable and amenable to change," says Nolan. All it takes to warm up the muscles before stretching is five to 10 minutes of light activity, such as a quick walk. You can also stretch after an aerobic or weight-training workout.

Hold a stretch for 30 seconds. Don't bounce, which can cause injury. You'll feel tension during a stretch, but you should not feel pain. If you do, there may be an injury or damage in the tissue. Stop stretching that muscle, and talk to your doctor.

 

Here at Metrolia Martial Arts -- stretching is an important part of our training.

Healthy Eating Simplified

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1. Give up soda and juices with lots of sugar

or high fructose corn syrup and Don’t drink all your calories. Save calories and drink water, various teas (especially Green Tea!) or black coffee. Skip the whip and chocolate in your coffee…save the calories for food.

2. Eat foods that are closest to their natural state as possible

When all else fails, just aim to eat whole, fresh foods in a rainbow of colors.

3. Eat alkaline-promoting foods

Research suggests that eating too many acidic foods can damage our lungs and kidneys. Balance out the acidity with foods that promote an alkaline body environment. Eat lots of root vegetables, calciferous vegetables  like broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts, leafy greens, garlic, cayenne peppers, and lemons and limes (yes, they seem acidic but lemons and limes actually help to alkaline our bodies and balance our pH).

4. Select healthier choices to have on standby

in your fridge when hunger pains or emotional eating strikes, such as a bowl of fresh strawberries or blueberries.

5. Shop the perimeter of your grocery store

The perimeter of the store is where food tends to be the healthiest and isn’t primarily packaged and processed.

6. Eat smaller portions

Portion control is one of the best things you can do for your health—especially when you are eating an indulgence food.

7. Equip yourself with healthy products to support your healthy lifestyle

New gear is always a motivation to get moving! 

8. Eat slowly

Put your fork down in between bites. It sounds simple, but so often we’re all on auto-pilot and shoveling food in our mouths before our stomachs can figure out that we’re full.

9. Keep a food journal on paper, online or with an app

Tracking keeps you accountable and studies show that people who keep food journals are more successful at losing weight than those who don’t. I love the MyFitnessPal app!

10. Add protein to smoothies

I like BiPro protein as there’s no added sugars or artificial flavors.

11. Reduce the amount of processed and packaged foods you consume

Generally speaking, the fewer ingredients, the better the food.

Does Building Muscle Burn Fat, Burn Calories & Increase Metabolism?

How many times have you read an article about weight loss that contained a list of “fat burning tips” or any kind of advice aimed at helping you lose fat better, faster or easier?

And how many of those times did you come across the suggestion that weight training is super important, because it will allow you to build muscle… and building muscle will significantly help you burn more calories, increase your metabolism and burn fat faster?

You’ve heard it a million times, haven’t you?

The thing is, while this advice is based on truth, it’s mostly exaggerated bs.

 Image source: https://gethealthyu.com/101-fitness-tips-that-rock/

Image source: https://gethealthyu.com/101-fitness-tips-that-rock/

Muscle Burns Fat? Kinda…

The theory goes a little something like this. The human body naturally burns more calories each day to maintain a pound of muscle than it does to maintain a pound of fat. Therefore, the more muscle you build, the more calories your body will naturally burn each day at rest.

Which means, just by building muscle, you’ll significantly increase your metabolism and turn your body into a calorie burning, fat melting machine… and this will obviously improve your overall fat loss progress.

Now, is any of that actually true? Technically speaking, it kinda is. For example:

  • FACT: Your body really DOES burn more calories maintaining muscle than it does maintaining fat.
  • FACT: This means that YES, the more muscle you build, the more calories your body will naturally burn each day on its own.
  • FACT: Which means that building muscle DOES increase your metabolism.
  • FACT: And this all means that building muscle definitely has the potential to help you lose fat.

With me so far? Good, because here’s where it all starts to get a little screwy.

You see, the problem with this theory/advice isn’t so much that it’s wrong but rather that it’s just highly exaggeratedway over-hyped (usually to sell some crappy product), and extremely insignificant in terms of the actual effect building muscle will have on helping you lose fat.

How Many Calories Does Muscle REALLY Burn?

To get to the root of the problem, you need to understand how many calories muscle actually burns. Depending on where you get your diet and fitness information from, you may come across the suggestion that 1 pound of muscle burns as much as 25, or 50, or even 100 additional calories per day.

If this were true, then building 5lbs of muscle would lead to as much as 500 extra calories being burned by your body per day, and this would indeed be a huge increase to your metabolism that would indeed have a significant positive effect on your ability to burn fat.

Unfortunately, muscle doesn’t burn anywhere near that amount of calories.

Instead, based on all the research I’ve seen, the actual numbers are more like this…

One pound of muscle burns approximately 5-6 calories per day at rest.

Wow… 5 or 6 whole calories?!?! I can feel my metabolism increasing as we speak!

This would mean that building 5lbs of muscle would lead to you burning an additional 25-30 calories per day. Building 10lbs of muscle would lead to a whopping 50-60 extra calories burned per day. You’d have to build the maximum amount of muscle that your body is capable of building in your entire lifetime before the amount of calories it burns gets even close to the crazy “significant” levels people incorrectly assume.

And in case you’re wondering, 1 pound of fat burns about 2 calories at rest. So yeah, muscle does burn more calories than fat… but not exactly enough for it to truly matter in the end. I mean, if you lost 5lbs of fat and gained 5lbs of muscle, your metabolism would increase by a whole 15-20 calories per day.

I think that deserves another sarcastic wow… “WOW!”

The Moral Of This Story

So, what’s the takeaway message here? It’s pretty simple.

While I will always recommend weight training during fat loss (primarily because it’s a requirement for maintaining muscle while losing fat), the idea that it’s helping you build muscle and this muscle is having a significant fat burning effect is mostly just exaggerated bullshit that is often:

  • A) Repeated by people who don’t know what they’re talking about (like most fitness myths are).
  • B) Used to help sell some junky product built mostly on hype and fancy marketing. (“Build Muscle And Turn Your Body Into A Fat Torching Furnace!”)
  • C) Used to fill yet another generic list of “fat loss tips” written by some clueless person who’s just rewriting the same nonsense they stole from some other equally useless list of tips.

So, will building muscle help you burn fat? Potentially… a tiny bit. However, while every little bit helps, it’s unlikely it will ever make anywhere near enough of a difference to truly have a significant effect on your fat loss efforts.

Instead of trying to increase your metabolism, you’ll be better off trying to eat less total calories (or trying to increase activity to burn more of them). This will always have the legit significant fat burning effect you’re looking for.

 

if you’re looking for a proven program that will allow you to lose fat as quickly and effectively as possible… WITHOUT losing muscle, or feeling hungry all the time, or giving up the foods you love, or doing tons of cardio, or following annoying diet rules, or experiencing excessive metabolic slowdown, or regaining any fat afterwards… you should check out any of our martial arts programs today -- I recommend Muay Thai!

Source: https://www.aworkoutroutine.com/does-building-muscle-burn-fat/